With his Red Robe in the Court

“If you work on sand for oil; you wouldn’t get any drop”, is the expression that I totally find astounding. This proverb is contrary to everything you hear from the other side. But there is more wisdom in that proverb. 
My father, with his red robes insisted to the court that we have a month long time to pay. His view comes from a broad perspective of wisdom he had inculcated in his lifetime, and a genuine concern to see his daughter do well. Therefore the complainant’s reaction, questioning his qualification and his daughter’s complacency over their money, is unfortunate one.  
The wisdom, an old man has cannot be compared. With passion from the opponents side, widened from his oblique smile combined with the genuine wisdom, has culminated the courtroom drama to its nearest possible resolution. 

“Merit of raising up a horse is its kick”, is the another expression I am truly confounded with. Yet it is one of the mosaics of lives which we ourselves seemed to be confined with. He explained that he is going for pilgrimage day after and that he can only be ushered in court after his pilgrimage. His honor seems to wear smile on his face with this man’s words. Nevertheless the judge beheaded the resolution to what we have agreed to. At this moment I remembered Anne Frank’s entry, “Despite anything; every human is good at heart”.  Though falsified and aggressive at the start the complainants were kind enough to set the required timing. Thanks to them; and to the wisdom a man in red robe had.

I never did raise my head up high. I never had a reason to. All I did was listen to their conversation and see what comes out. Indeed I have been thinking I would appeal one more time if the court’s decision is not up to our thinking. I was born a wild plant, and not a potted, I basically know the very reasoning of our survival, the need and the desire of self to get more after getting. I wanted to showcase the false images and knew that my tears would do the trick. However the tempered steel still needed to be sharpened and that’s why my father didn’t let me testify the case. Thanks to him.

My father, a benign gentleman, never failed to perform duties of both mother and a father. It would be really hard to say he isn’t a good father. He is the model and an example to any father of a motherless destitute. The geneses of his interests in serving all sentient beings are boundless. All he wishes is for a peaceful death and before that a way to pilgrim. But the point was his way of testifying in the courtroom. When later I asked how he has been such a brilliant man though being a profession of farmer. He was telling me that the wisdom is acquired through experience and he had testified 13 cases prior to the one we have been to.
It reminded me of Bernard’s word which says, “People are wise in proportion not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience.” At that instant I asked, why 13 cases? I was intrigued. And his reply was more bizarre, “I had to bring up 8 children together and as a farmer it wasn’t easy for me.” Without a question I knew then, George Bernard Shaw was right and so is my father.

Comments

  1. If i were to have a wish i would wish that i could creat a miracle.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

A thinkable Paradox?

Dechen's Guilt

KINGDOM